What Does HR Do?

Type this into Google, and you get 3,880, 000,000 results. Seems like HR does a lot. Let me break it down for you.images

  1. HR “keeps the lights on”- we process payroll, administer benefits enrollment, process direct deposits, answer 401k questions, reset your ADP password, interpret company policies for managers, walk employees through leaves of absence, fix employee PTO balances and gather acknowledgement forms.
  2. HR tries to create an environment where employees feel safe and secure. We make sure there are band aids, that staff is trained in first-aid, we take first reports of injury, we create policies around front-desk security, deliver discrimination and harassment prevention training and monitor the work environment for bullying or violations of standards of conduct.
  3. HR plans social activities, but we don’t like to. In companies, the job of potlucks, holiday parties, birthday celebrations, baby showers, pumpkin carving contests and all-hands meetings usually lands in the lap of HR. Not only does it suck but it totally erodes the value of what a good HR department can do for a company.
  4. HR creates brand strategies. We figure out the value of the organization and what it can provide, package that message and use it when attracting talent to the company.
  5. HR does not terminate employees. Managers do. When managers are not satisfied with an employee, they come to HR. HR asks a series of questions to investigate the issue, determine the cause and make recommendations. If one of those solutions is termination, HR further investigates to make sure the termination is not wrongful. HR may be in the room to witness the discussion, but we do not pull that trigger and we do not deliver that message.
  6. HR partners with management to determine talent needs and develops strategies to find that talent. This is an ongoing and continuously challenging responsibility.
  7. HR covers the companies’ ass. HR practitioners must stay on top of Federal and State Laws,  and County and City Ordinances, interpret the repercussions of those laws on the company and work environment and advise leadership accordingly.
  8. HR helps company leadership develop compensation philosophy. HR takes into account the companies’ financials, the organization’s mission, vision and values and makes recommendations on the company’s direct and indirect compensation and benefits package.
  9. HR mediates disputes in the workplace, disputes between employees, disputes between managers and employees, disputes between leadership and employees.
  10. HR does not deliver disciplinary warnings or performance discussions to employees. Again, these are a manager’s jobs. HR gets involved to help document issues, serve as a witness to the discussion or we get involved when the manager botches it.

This is by no means an exhaustive list but is just a sampling, if you will, of what HR does. For those who don’t know.

12 More Red Flags You May Work for a Bosshole

Angry businessman shouting to an employee

Angry businessman shouting to an employee

In my previous blog, 11 Red Flags You Work for a Bosshole, I laid out some key indicators of bad manager behavior.

With over ten plus years working in Human Resources, I have either heard of or witnessed all of these behaviors. Without further ado, I present 12 more red flags you may work for a bosshole.

  1. They set unrealistic deadlines and have no respect for your schedule.

  2. They say they don’t like drama, but are literally the epicenter of all drama shit storms.

  3. They do not collaborate well with other managers.

  4. They are immature- calling people names, mocking people, putting people down.

  5. They do not handle intra-department employee conflicts and are content with letting them fester.

  6. They lie or they spin reality to fit their own agenda.

  7. They put you in ethically precarious situations.

  8. They schedule meetings as a means of communicating everything when a simple email or phone call will work.

  9. They put their entire email content into the Subject line. 

  10. They do not say thank you.

  11. They know nothing about you nor bother to get to know anything about you.

  12. They don’t offer any feedback on your performance. Or, only offer feedback when it’s negative. 

    Share your manager horror stories in the comments. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11 Red Flags You Work for a Bosshole

Quintessential Bosshole

Quintessential Pop Culture Bosshole

A bosshole in modern vocabulary is the conjoining of the words boss and asshole. Bossholes come in many shapes and sizes. Some managers can be described as having bosshole tendencies while others may be full-fledged bossholes.

Bossholes are not to be confused with Managers who actually manage and lead. Managers who set high expectations for your work product, who demand your professional best, who push you to develop yourself, who offer constructive criticism and who may have to get very real with you on your potential with the company are not to be confused with bossholes. If you work for a Manager who does these things, keep on, keepin’ on. This type of Manager likely wants to see you succeed. Listen to them. Do what they tell you. And learn from them.

Bossholes are career vampires. They will suck your professional soul leaving nothing but an empty shell of an employee who at best is disengaged and at worst, operates with underlying hostilities. Depending on the degree of boss-holishness, you have some choices. You can possibly have a candid discussion with said bosshole, you can skip-level that conversation to his or her boss, seek guidance from your HR professional, seek a transfer or look for a new job.

Here, in no particular order, are 11 red flags you may work for a bosshole:

  1. Their office door is open, but they do not have “open-door” policy.
  2. They avoid one-on-one meetings with you and your team members like the plague.
  3. They delegate all tasks but zero authority.
  4. They delegate all tasks and all authority to senior team members in order to avoid their supervisory duties.
  5. They throw employees under the bus to make themselves look better.
  6. They take credit for their employee’s work.
  7. They do not  show genuine gratitude for your hard work and effort.
  8. They change their mind on goals and objectives for the department every 7-10 days.
  9. They can’t or won’t roll up their sleeves in times of critical need.
  10. They do not follow through on commitments.
  11. They drive-by drop a bunch of stuff on your plate.

Have you ever worked for a bosshole? Share your bosshole red flags in the comments.

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Ten Ways to Impress Your Boss.

  1. Show up on time.

Nothing earth shattering here. But believe me, not showing up on time is the easiest and fastest way to hurt your credibility and lose respect amongst your team members.

  1. Act like you care.

We all have to do things in our job that we would rather not do. The boring stuff. The things that are not challenging and have no bearing on our professional development. Don’t complain, suck it up.

  1. Learn more.

Get a mentor. Join a professional organization. Pursue professional certifications or designations. Job shadow with other departments. Become indispensable by accumulating experience, knowledge, skills and abilities.

  1. Get Self-Aware

Take the PI, DISC or Myers Briggs assessments and do some self-reflection. Know what you do well and build on it. Recognize what you suck at, forgive yourself and move on. It’s easier to work on your strengths.

  1. Perform like every day is an interview for your next job.

If you work for a strategic, forward-thinking organization, the Senior Leadership will no doubt  have a succession plan. They will recruit with an eye towards determining who their high-potential employees are. Be the employee they think of during these conversations.

  1. Stretch yourself.

Volunteer for a challenging project, jump on a cross-functional team, get a seat on the company wellness committee.

  1. Up your Emotional IQ

Build meaningful relationships with your coworkers inside and outside of your department or team. Know people’s names. Ask them questions. Get to know them.

  1. Do not make excuses.

Own your accomplishments and most certainly own your mistakes and failures. Learn from them. Show some accountability. No one respects the peer who deflects blame, spins reality in their favor and scapegoats.

  1. Be the champion of you.103380a

You are your own best advocate. Get constructive feedback from your manager and peers early and often. Keep a diary or file of the things you knock out of the park and don’t let your manager forget.

  1. Get Shit Done.

Period.